't Hoeske van Thais Joaptje

This probably is the smallest home in the province of Groningen. Currently you may visit this smallest house as a museum. It is furnished as a workers’ house in 1835. The house is open all days of the  week. Please enter. 

Contact

Address:
Kloosterweg 17
9998 XD Rottum
Plan your route

  At the countryside in the province of Groningen you might find rich and huge farms. These farms  express the wealth of the Groningen…

  At the countryside in the province of Groningen you might find rich and huge farms. These farms  express the wealth of the Groningen farmers. In the nineteenth century these modern farmers  employed several labourers, often more than a dozen. These workers had however great difficulty in  making ends meet. If these poor workers were lucky, they owned a one-room-house like this Hoeske  of Thais Jaoptje. The parents slept in the bedstead. The children slept at the loft. The bathroom was  outside. And all eating, drinking and talking was done in just one room. The last family with four  children that lived here left this house in 1954.    This small house is built in the early nineteenth century. In building this little house old stones from  the former monastery were used. The former Benedictine monastery was in use from 1224 till 1594.  After the Reformation in 1594 the abbey was abandoned and the stones were then recycled for all  kinds of dwellings and streets in the village of Rottum and its surroundings.    The name of the small house is derived from a story told by Jan Boer in 1934. Jan Boer is a well  known author. He published his books, songs and stage plays  in the Groningen dialect. He is born in  Rottum, just opposite the small house. His bust in bronze can be seen at the fence in the front of the  small house. Jan Boer told us that Thais was an old spinster, the daughter of Thais, who lived in the  small house before the war and that she always attended all gatherings in the local church (just  behind this small house). But although Thais attended all church services, she still was convinced the  place where Christ was born was in the neighbouring farm with the name Bethlehem. If you drive  through the small village of Rottum you may notice the first farm is still called: Bethlehem.  In the small house we have the opportunity to organize small exhibitions. The present exhibition is  about copper polishing, a typical female activity, Thais Jaoptje might engage in. Other exhibitions  focused on house cleaning and child care.